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20121126
20121126
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> reporter: factions opposed to mr. morsi continue to make moves to apply political pressure on the president egyptian nobel laureate and pro-democracy activist mohammed el-baradei, calling on mr. porshei to rescind his decrees. on saturday you will recall a judges' group calling to a nationwide judges' strike and it's not clear how many judges will heed that call because remember a lot of judges here in egypt support mr. morsi and the muslim brotherhood and so do a lot of egyptians. calling for demonstrations throughout the next few days and that is why there is a lot of drama that comes with these developments. you have mr. morsi, seemingly entrenched in power. the muslim brotherhood movement taking on opposing factions who are mobilizing, demanding for him to rescind his decrees. reza sayah, cairo. >>> and tension is rising again in gaza and 6 minutes what israeli satellites or thely saw. >>> authorities in massachusetts say they know what triggered that massive natural gas explosion we first showed you on friday. this blast leveled buildings and injured dozens in springfield massachusetts
and demanding that mr. morsi rescind his controversial decre decrees. >> to start with i want these decrees to be withdrawn and secondly, i would hope he starts to listen to us and the people. >> i am willing to stay until we oust him just like we did with mubarak. he's bringing it down on himself. >> reporter: factions opposed to mr. morsi continued to make moves to apply political pressure on the president. pro-democracy activist mohammed el baradi calling on morsi to rescind his decrees. it's not clear how many judges are going to heed the call for a strike because remember a lot of judges in egypt support mr. morsi and the muslim brotherhood and so do a lot of egyptians. supporters of muslim brotherhood have called for demonstrations throughout the next few days, and that's why there's a lot of drama that comes with these developments. you have mr. morsi seemingly entrenched in power. the muslim brotherhood movement taking on opposing factions who are mobilizing, demanding for him to rescind his decrees. rez sesay a -- reza sayah, cair. >>> we have learned a delegation from gaza is now
judicial counsel. of course, the judges locking horns with mr. morsi right after one of his decrees essentially disabled them. so they're talking. we're going to see what the outcome of that meeting is. in the meantime, the leading factions, leading opposition factions continue to protest behind us in tahrir square. these factions that represent women's rights groups, youth groups, minorities, their position so far has been we're not going to talk to mr. morsi until he reverses his decrees. we spoke to one of mr. morsi's top advisers earlier today. we asked him if that was a possibility. >> what kind of concessions are you willing to make? >> this decision is up to the president for us. >> is it possible to rescind his decrees? >> we have had a dialogue. >> reporter: are you prepared to consider rescinding, adjusting some of these decrees? >> decree is up to the president and we are accepting it. we may have some reservations. but as a whole, we must take a step to forward, not to backward. >> reporter: as you heard, we pressed them on the why reasonable degree idea of the president
this unacceptable. we thank mr. morsi for his efforts in brokering a cease-fire, which is fragile but this is not what the united states of america taxpayers expect and our dollars will be directly related to the progress towards democracy which you promised the people of egypt when your party and you were elected president. >> chris: let's talk about that because morsi took his steps ours after secretary of state hillary clinton praised him for helping to broker the peace deal between hamas and israel and the administration issued the state department a tepid criticism. how tough should they get? should they say you have to pull back? what should our demands and leverage be? >> our leverage is not only substantial bayance and aid, plus an imf deal but the marshaling world public opinion is also against this kind of move by mr. morsi. we appreciate president morsi's action but in the past it's always been the united states that's brokered these deals and there's a clear perception amongst hamas that they won on this one. unfortunately the plo, abbas and others, have been diminishe
of move by mr. morsi. >> both morsi and his opponents are saying that his move is terror. >> we will not leave until morsi and his regime leave. >> a meeting announced for monday between president morsi and the supreme judiciary council could signal the first hint of compromise but for now neither side is backing down. in cairo, steve harrigan. >>> there's a report that long range iranian rockets are on the way to gaza. according to the sunday times, an israeli spy satellite spotted rockets and weapons being loaded. the time sides an unnamed israeli source who claims rockets which were used to hit telaviv in the latest con -- conflict. iran supplies rockets to hamas between a tunnel between egypt. >>> people are lined up in rows after a fire in a garment plant. the factory made garments for wal-mart and other western outlets. since 2006, at least 600 workers have died in factory fires in bangladesh. >>> catalonians argue that they spend more in taxs in madrid than they get back. the spanish government vows to block any referendum arguing that the country does not allow a region
cases brought against the controversial decrees declared by mr. morsi last week. here's where the intrigue comes in. last week one of his decrees banned anyone, any authority, even the judiciary from questioning and overturning any of his decisions since he took office. we'll see how that plays out. meantime protests continue. there doesn't seem to be a resolution to this conflict. the leaders of the opposition factions have dug in saying we're not going to have dialogue until mr. morsi rescinds his decrees. a few hours ago we spoke to one of his top advisers and we asked him, is that a possibility? >> what kind of concessions are you willing to make. >> this decision is up to the president, not for us. >> is it possible -- is it possible he will rescind his decrees. >> dialogue with our -- >> are you prepared to consider rescinding, adjusting some of these decrees? >> decree is up to the president. we are accepting it. we may have some reservations. but as a whole we must take a step to -- forward, not to backward. >> reporter: that was one of the top advisers for mr. morsi.
and thank mr. morsi for his efforts in brokering a cease-fire, which is, by the way, incredibly fragile but is not what is acceptable, what the american taxpayers expect and our dollars will be directly related to the progress towards democracy, which you promised the people of egypt, when your party and you were elected president. >> chris: let's talk about that. because, morsi took his step hours after secretary of state clinton praised him for helping broker the deal between hamas and israel and so far, at least the administration issued, the state department, a tepid criticism. how tough should they get with them? directly say pull back, what should our demands an leverage be? >> our leverage is obviously, not only the substantial billions in aid we provide, plus, debt forgiveness and an i. -- an imf deal, but the marshalling world publish opinion is against this kind of move by mr. morsi. we appreciate president morsi's action but it always in the past the united states that brokered the deals and there is a clear perception at least amongst hamas that they won on this one. and, un
or a law he imposes until a new constitution is finalized. mr. morsi extended the time to write the new constitution and he dismissed the country's attorney general. reza sayah is overlooking everything in tahrir square. most of us were thinking that mohammed morsi really very much the peacemaker, key to the cease-fire between israel and hamas. doesn't even settle with the truce and then morsi announces this decree essentially a huge power grab. what is the significance? >> reporter: well, suzanne, the significance is until a parliament is formed here in egypt, until a constitution is drafted, he is the most powerful man in egypt, and, technically, he can do whatever he wants without any apparent oversight. that's why he is being called egypt's new dictator. that's why you have thousands of protests taking place behind us in tahrir square. the protesters represent the opposing factions, the liberals, the secularists, women's rights groups, the youth groups. essentially, their position is that we're not going to talk to mr. morsi until he rescinds his decrees, and we spoke to one of his
this is unacceptable. we thank mr. morsi for his efforts in brokering a ceasefire, which, by the way, is incredibly fragile. but this is not acceptable. and our dollars will be related to the progress of democracy which he promised the people of egypt. oot muslim brotherhood and president morsi's opponents in cairo on tuesday ahead of those planned protests. today morsi will meet with the country's top judges in the hopes of solving this crisis. nbc's ayman joins us now. instead of the leader whose letter begins with 346 but it's not mubarak we're talking about, it's morsi. what's going on today? >> reporter: well, you're right. that's what the people here in tahrir square have been telling us, that they've replaced one dictator for another and, in fact, you can't really emphasize this enough. it's all about a domino effect here in egypt. let's start with the most developing news and that is a cairo court has agreed to hear a lawsuit by 60 lawyers for that decree he issued on thursday. this is precisely the problem morsi says he is facing day in and day out. every time he tries to take a decision,
of the opposition faction continue to demand mr. morsi to rescind his decrees. we just spoke to one of his senior advisers a couple of hours ago. he wants dialogue with the leading opposition factions. he didn't say anything about these decrees today. there are talks scheduled with the judges. but at this hour, no talks scheduled with the opposition factions. tomorrow big protests on both sides. both the opposing factions and mr. morsi the muslim brotherhood calling for 1 million man protests. >> interesting timing, of course, as they try to negotiate some kind of a peace treaty there or at least continuing relation of talks with the peace talks reza sayah for us. >>> holiday shoppers in full force through black friday. did you go shopping, christine? >> heck no. have you read my book, soledad? don't spend money you don't have. >> 247, that's a record, 247 million? >> it is a record number but it's stretched out over four days now. now the days are thursday through sunday. let me throw in cyber monday, right, so it all comes together in huge, huge four-day frenzy of buying. >> total spending of w
thank mr. morsi for his efforts in brokering a cease fire which is incredibly fragile but this is not acceptable and the united states of america taxpayers expect and our dollars will be directly related to the progress toward demaddress which you promised the people of egypt when your party and you were elected president. >> brian: joining us is the navy commander from the office of secretary of defense under george bush. he is jd gordon. is it up to the president to get more involved to tell morsi to stop with the absolute monarch thing. >> i think the president should stand up to the muslim brotherhood and say we will not send aid dollars to egypt. morsi put himself [pwao-fr] the courts and law. it is one dick traitorship replaced by another. we need to get tough on egypt. >> steve: when the arab spring first started people were optmistic and it is not turning out the way we hoped it would. >> no, in 2010 the survey poll in egypt found that 17 percent of the egyptians were favorable to the united states and 24 percent favorable to al-qaida and 60 percent to the isla
department. >> were you for warrant that mr. mursi was going to do this? -- were you forewarned mr. morsi was going to do this? >> these are separate issues. we have raised our concerns and that, i think in party answers your question. secretary clinton is focused on working with the president down others, prime minister netanyahu, to help bring about a ceasefire and other allies can be saved and the possibility of moving forward on negotiations for more enduring peace could be realized. that was very important. the president played a very important role in that. separately, we have raised concerns about some of the decisions and declarations made on november 22nd and we continue to engage on this with the egyptians. the important thing is that the egyptian people want a government that reflects their will and we accept that. >> it was murky before thanksgiving. can you clarify the $4 trillion in debt as a reduction of over 10 years? >> it is reflected in his budget proposals that i know you all have read covered cover and is still the most substantive proposal by an elected official that
with mubarak. we are going to oust him. >> now today mr. morsi and the muslim brotherhood are scheduled to meet with the judges, the supreme judicial council, that's one of the groups that his decrees undermine. the problem is, there is no dialogue to get to the leaders of some of the other oppositions. >> and more than $4 billion as well and the judges are threatening to strike. so even with all of that, no decision for morsi to revoke that decree? >> well, we just spoke to one of his senior advisers, and he seemed to suggest that he might consider it, but many will say that if he backs up, it would be a politically wrong move for him. that it will be a sign of weakness. for now, there are no indications from his office that he wants to reverse the decree. >> and reza, just as we were going on air israel's defense minister ehud barak resigned. how could this affect today's talks between israel and hamas? >> it's not clear how ehud barak's resignation is going to impact these talks. but i doubt these talks are going to fall apart the decision for a cease-fire last week were made by the top offi
? >> dialogue. >> reporter: they want dialogue. they want concessions. they want mr. morsi to rescind his decrees. what kind of concessions are you willing to make? . >> the decision is up to the president. not up to us. we are ready for dialogue with our -- >> reporter: are you prepared to consider rescinding, adjusting some of those decrees? >> decree is up to the president, accepting it -- we may have some reservations. but as a whole, we must take a step forward, not backward. >> reporter: so two big headlines coming out of egypt today, first off, president morsi not scaling back his decrees, sticking with them and the muslim brotherhood calling off their 1 million-man demonstration scheduled for tomorrow. >> we'll have a lot more on this story coming up later this hour. thanks very much, reza sayah, from cairo. >>> other news we're following, including news from afghanistan as the united states looks to wind down its troop strength in afghanistan, plans are being made for a u.s. military force to stay on there even after the 2014 handover to afghan authorities. our pentagon correspon
. >> the president said a month ago he didn't know whether egypt is our ally or not. >> we'll see. mr. morsi was involved in the ceasefire. but i think it is up to him now to demonstrate that he is going to stand with us, going to hohn 0or that peace treaty with israel that is so important to u.s. interests in the region, and actually facilitate what all of us would like to see there which is freedom for more egyptians. >> politically morsi seems clearly to be siding with hamas in that conflict. was he just playing for a certain element in egypt? because behind the scenes he was working with us to broker a peace. >> he is of the muslim brotherhood party. it is a party steeped in some of the very, very anti-western, anti-american ways. hamas has the same roots so it is a political situation that's very challenging but we look to him to be a leader and come down on the side of freedom and to recognize israel's right to exist as a jewish state in the region. that's what we're going to look for especially when he is coming to the white house which will come to congress to look for taxpayer aid f
, secretary clinton did call the foreign minister of egypt, mr. amr, and tried to get some clarification. they discussed this not only this political issue of president morsi, but the issue of gaza, where he played a very important role, and that is why secretary clinton was in that region, just last week. but the -- there is concern and let's listen to what the spokesperson for the state department, victoria newland, had to say about it. >> it is a very murky uncertain period in terms of the legal and constitutional underpinnings, which makes it all the more important that the process proceed on the basis of democratic dialogue and consultation. >> so if it is murky, they are watching it very, very closely. in fact, one thing that victoria nuland said, the right people are talking to each other. that's good news. they want this to happen, number one, peacefully, and number two, democratically. and, you know, brooke, on another issue that funding the imf, of course, just reached an agreement with egypt on some badly needed funds that they needed, and there is a question also here in the
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)